'Diesel Brothers' stars violated Utah's Clean Air Act, court rules


    <p>Stars of the Discovery Channel show "Diesel Brothers" are accused of violating the Clean Air Act (CAA) and Utah law, according to court documents. (Photo courtesy of Diesel Brothers) {/p}

    Stars of the Discovery Channel show "Diesel Brothers" are accused of violating the Clean Air Act (CAA) and Utah law, according to court documents.

    Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment, an organization that works to protect the health of the community and improve the environment, announced the violations in court on Wednesday.

    The Utah Federal District Court ruled the "Diesel Brothers" did the following:

    • Illegally removed pollution control equipment from diesel trucks
    • Illegally installed emission control defeat parts in diesel trucks
    • Illegally sold diesel vehicles with emission control defeat parts installed
    • Illegally sold emission control defeat parts
    • Illegally operated diesel vehicles in Utah without emission control equipment installed

    The stars claimed the excess emissions from their trucks were a "drop in the ocean" compared to emissions from other pollution sources in Utah. The court disagreed, according to a press release. Click here to read ruling.

    UPHE was allowed to enforce the CAA against "Diesel Brothers."

    The court reasoned that “a causation standard that precludes citizens from suing for CAA violations directly contributing pollution to the air they breathe would seriously undermine the CAA’s citizen enforcement provision.”

    Dr. Brian Moench, UPHE President stated in a press release:

    "Diesel emissions are a major contributor to air pollution in every city, and they are uniquely toxic to human health. American citizens, and every level of government, should have zero tolerance for anyone that tries to profit from a hobby or business practice that brazenly sacrifices the health of others."

    On June 8, 2018, a Utah judge interviewed with an order which prohibited the men from reselling any vehicles with modifications that could violate the CAA.

    UPHE sued the four men in January 2017, claiming they made modifications that exceeded pollution limits.

    On the show, the men buy diesel trucks, modify them at their shop and resell them online.

    The environmentalist group claims the crew has modified emissions controls on 17 vehicles.


    News In Photos

      Loading ...