Millcreek residents gave city leaders an earful for trying to declare their homes dumps

It was a packed room at Millcreek City’s government offices Tuesday night — about 300 people showed up to watch, listen and speak out. The majority of those who did speak wanted to get on the record that they don’t think their homes are a dump. (Photo: KUTV)

(KUTV) — It was a packed room at Millcreek City’s government offices Tuesday night — about 300 people showed up to watch, listen and speak out.

The majority of those who did speak wanted to get on the record that they don’t think their homes are a dump.

The city wants to develop the neighborhood around 3300 South and Highland Drive into a city center with shops, restaurants, high-density housing, some parks and maybe even a new city hall.

The city is afraid of holdouts, so it’s making moves that could force folks to sell — whether they want to or not.

A blight study was commissioned, which deemed that 68 percent of the area is rundown, unkempt or in disrepair. Doing so gives the city eminent domain power over all property in the area.

Tonight, some told city leaders ways the study got it wrong.

Tina Grant's home has been declared a blight by the City of Millcreek for a small reason that seems to be 100 percent the city’s fault: the sidewalk and road out front are in disrepair.

"As a homeowner, I should be free to sell or to keep my property as I want to," Grant said.

Don and Carrie Knapton have lived in the neighborhood for 64 years. They say they fear that blight declaration will make their home worth significantly less.

No final decision was made by city leaders on whether or not to accept the blight study. There is another public hearing on the subject scheduled for December 10, after which the Millcreek Community Reinvestment Agency will make a decision.

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